Monday, 8 February 2016

COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST - POLI362 : DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION





Department of Political Science
University of Ghana
POLI 362: Development Administration
Second Semester, 2015/2016

                                        Dr. Emmanuel Debrah
  Office Location: F16 Kweku Folson Building, Dept. of Political Science
Office Hours: Monday 11:30-13:30 Wed 9.30-10:30am
                            

Course Title
DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION
Course Code
362
Course Overview and Objectives:
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major issues, concepts, problems and theories associated with development administration. It examines efforts developing countries are making to administer their development programs and how to improve their administrative systems that will expand the possibilities of their citizens. To this end, the course focuses on the processes and strategies for the administration of development in the developing societies. It begins on the operating premise that no singular factor such as political, economic, sociological explanations, as commonly found in theories of development economics and administration are adequate in explaining the myriad problems and efforts being made to improve the economic, political and social systems toward a better or more humane life for the people in the developing world. Specifically, the course addresses the following critical issues and concerns in the discipline:
WEEK NO.
LECTURE TOPIC
TUTORIALS
ASSESSMENT
1
What is development?
Explain development and why it is useful

2
Identify the characteristic of developing countries
Explain characteristics of developing countries

3
Trends and issues in development administration
Elements and Issues in  Development Administration

4
Development Programs in developing Societies
Development programs as agenda in developing countries

5
Strategies for administering development
Context and processes of development strategies

6
Development Planning, Administrative Reforms, decentralization in Public Sector
Why development planning and administrative reforms?

7
Poverty- A developmental Issue  
What is poverty?
Main views of poverty

8
Tackling the phenomenon of poverty  
Poverty reduction policies/programs


9
Corruption in Development
Scale of corruption and developing countries

10
Corruption and Underdevelopment in developing Countries
Fundamental causes of corruption and underdevelopment

11
Development Problems
Challenges involved in development

12
Ways to address development deficit in developing countries
Techniques to address development deficit

13
Ways to address development deficit in developing countries
Techniques to address development deficit

14
Student Revision
          15-16
EXAMINATION (70%)


Prescribed Textbook:
Polinaidu, S. 2004.  Public administration. New Delhi: Galgotia Publications Ltd. pp. 559-590.

Readings

Handelman, Howard. 2003. The challenges of third world development 3rd ed. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River.
World Bank. 2000. “New Directions in Developing Thinking” and “Decentralization: Rethinking Government” in Entering the 21st century: World Development Report 1999/2000. Oxford University Press: New York.
World Bank. 2001. World Development Reports, 2000-2001: Attacking Poverty. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Todaro, M.P. 2000. Economic Development in the 3rd world. New York: Longman.
Republic of Ghana. 2009. Growth and Poverty Reduction Strategy II
Republic of Ghana. 2005. Ghana Poverty Reduction strategy I
Dwivedi, O. P. 1994. Development Administration: From Underdevelopment to Sustainable Development. New York: St Martin’s Press.
Riggs, Fred. 1971. Frontiers of Development: From Underdevelopment to Sustainable Development. Longman: New York.
Rondenelli, D. A., and Cheema, G. 2003. “Analyzing Decentralization Policies in developing Countries: a Political-economy framework”. Development and Change 20(1):57-87.
Republic of Ghana. 2003. National Decentralization Action Plan: Towards a Sector-Wide Approach for Decentralization Implementation in Ghana, 2003-2005. Tema: Ghana Publishing Corporation.
Conyers, D. 2007. “Decentralization and Service Delivery: Lessons from Sub-Saharan Africa”.IDS Bulletin 38 (1):18-32.
Gerald Caiden. 1988. ‘The Vitality of Administrative Reforms’. International Review of the Administrative Science. 54: 330-433.
Jrisast, J. E. 1988. Administrative Reform in Developing Countries: A Comparative Perspective ‘.Public Administration and Development. 8:80-90.



Wednesday, 3 February 2016

COURSE OUTLINE LINE AND READING LIST- POLI 442:SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THEORY



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
UNIVERSITY OF GHANA
FIRST SEMESTER, 2015/2016
   COURSE OUTLINE AND READING LIST
                     LECTURER: Dr. Ransford Gyampo  and  Dr. Evans Aggyrey-Darkoh
                                 
COURSE OUTLINE AND READINGS
COURSE TITLE
SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THEORY (GROUP A)
COURSE CODE
POLI 442
COURSE CREDITS
3
PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES
Welcome to POLI 402, Social & Political Theory. The course is designed to introduce you, to the nature, scope and role of Social and Political Theory. The word Theory is derived from the Greek word theoria which means mental focus. Social and Political theorizing therefore becomes whatever a person discovers as a result of serious introspective mental focus and speculations. Social and Political  theory as a distinct discipline emerged in the 20th century and was largely equated with an attitude of critical thinking, based on rationality, logic and objectivity, as well as the desire for knowledge through a-posteriori methods of discovery, rather than a-priori methods of tradition.  The course presents an attempt to provide a comprehensive taxonomy for explaining socio-political issues. For example, there have been numerous coups and military interventions in Africa. An attempt to study and observe these phenomena in order to provide a coherent explanation falls within the realm of theorizing. It is logically plausible for one to argue that social and political theorizing is part of political philosophy as one cannot offer an explanation of a phenomenon without first doing some serious thinking about it.  With this in mind, it is easy to link social and political theory to deep seated philosophical discussions.

The course also deals with the expositions of classical thinkers that must often be contextualized to help in understanding contemporary issues of social and political discourse. We must notify you in advance that given the somewhat abstract nature of this course, it tends to be a “scare-crow” to many undergraduates. However, what such students fail to realize is that far from being a thorn in their flesh, social and political theory is their friend. Indeed, if you are interested in Political Science, as we suppose, and if you are interested in pursuing further studies in Law, then you should love social and political theory the more. This is because, political theory is “the father of Political Science.” Again some of the critical issues that would be thought in Jurisprudence for law students are delved into by this course. It is therefore important to study this course as it assures you of a firm foundation and grounding for future political and intellectual discourses. It helps you to appreciate “what is political” or the domain of politics; approaches to the study of politics and other critical theories of politics that helps you to better understand the key issues that would preoccupy you, an upcoming Political Scientist. In our discussions, we will draw examples from the global setting with emphasis on Africa and Ghana. Do not worry too much about the seaming abstract nature of the course. We will contextualize the issues and with examples that hinges on contemporary happenings in our world today, we can assure you that we will certainly demystify every mystery that surround the course.

At the end of the course, you should be able to:
·         Define politics from your own perspective;
·         Explain the realm and domain of politics
·         Explain the scientific methodology and approach to the study of politics
·         Identify and explain the basic tenets and features of normative political theory, logical positivism/behavioralism,  institutionalism etc
·         Define and explain the basic features of feminism, noting its relevance in modern times
·         Distinguish between Constitutionalism and Rule of Law
·         Explain the nature of modern democracy etc, etc


OFFICE LOCATION
Department of Political Science, University of Ghana, Room 7
OFFICE HOURS
Mondays: 9.30am – 4.30pm
EMAIL

LECTURE PERIOD & VENUE
Tuesdays 3.30-5.30pm @ NNB 2
WEEK NO.
LECTURE TOPIC
TUTORIALS
ASSESSMENT
1
Nature and Scope of Politics
Teaching/Graduate Assistants to assist students in discussing the nature and scope of “the political”

2
The Science of Politics
Teaching/Graduate Assistants to assist students in defining and discussing the science of politics.

3
Normative Political Theory
Students to identify and discuss the main arguments of normativism

4
Normative Political Theory
Students to discuss the contributions of NPT to the study of politics as well as its weaknesses

5
Logical Positivism/Bahavioralism
Students to discuss the main arguments of logical positivism

6
Logical Positivism/Bahavioralism:
Students to discuss the strengths and weakenesses of the Behavioral approach

7
Feminism

Interim Assessment (30%)
8
Feminism
Students to be guided in discussing the central issues of feminism as a theory


9
Liberalism
Teaching Assistants to lead discussions on feminism

10
Constitutionalism/Rule of Law
Students to discuss the differences (if any)between constitutionalism and rule of law

11
Constitutionalism/Rule of Law
Students to identify the factors that promotes constitutionalism in a state

12
Nature of Modern Democracy
Student to subject Abraham Lincoln’s definition of democracy to critical scrutiny


13
Nature of Modern Democracy
Is democracy the most preferred form of government? What are its strengths and weaknesses? Teaching Assistants must lead discussions in offering answers to these questions

14
STUDENT REVISION
          15-17
EXAMINATION (70%)

SUGGESTED COURSE READINGS

Sabine George,  A History of Political Theory, (New York: Holt Rinehart and Winston, 1961).

Berlin, Isaiah, Political Ideas in the Twentieth Century, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002).

Barker, Ernest, Principles of Social and Political Theory , (Oxford: Clarendon, Press, 1951).

Raphael, D.D., Problems of Political Philosophy, (London: Pall Mall Press, 1970).
Mead, Margaret Sex and Temperament: In Three Primitive Societies  (New York: Harper Collins Publishers Inc, 2001).
Dunn, John (ed.), Democracy: The Unfinished Journey, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992).
Pateman, Carole The Sexual Contract  (NY: Polity Press, 1988).

Paris, D. C. & James F. Reynolds, The Logic of Political Inquiry, (New York: Longman Inc., 1983).

Landau, Martin, Political Theory and Political Science, (New Jersey: Humanities Press, 1979).

Mill, J.S., Autobiography , (London, 1873).

Chodorow, Nancy (1989). Feminism and Psychoanalytic Theory. (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press)

Bernstein, Richard,   The Reconstruction of Social and Political Theory, (New York: Harcourt Brace, 1977).

Bryant, C.G.A.,  Positivism in Social Theory and Research, (London: Macmillan Publishers Ltd, 1985).

Heywood, Andrew,  Political Theory: An Introduction, Second Edition, (New York: Palgrave, 1999).

Gamble, A., An Introduction to Modern Social and Political Thought, (London: Macmillan Education Ltd, 1981).

Gyampo, R.E.V., The State of Political Institutions in Ghana (Saarbrucken: Lambert Academic Publishing, 2013)

Iain, Mclean, Oxford Concise Dictionary of Politics,(New York: Oxford University Press, 1996).

McClelland, J.S.,   A History of Western Political Thought, (London: Routhledge, 2002).

Merriam, Charles, New Aspects of Politics  (Chicago: University of Chicago).

Bellamy, Richard and Angus Ross (eds.), A Textual Introduction to Social and Political Theory, (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1996).

MacKinnon, Catharine.  Feminism Unmodified: Discourses on Life and Law (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1987).

Koerner, Kirk. Liberalism and its Critics. (Oxford: Taylor & Francis, 1985).


REQUIREMENTS/ GENERAL INFORMATION
·         Extensive Reading (at least 70% of the required reading materials) is a MUST
·         There would be 13 weeks of lectures and students must endeavor to attend all lectures. The course shall not be done by correspondence.
·         Students must be punctual in attending all lectures. No lateness would be tolerated
·         Students MUST attend tutorials regularly and make MEANINGFUL contributions to class discussions.
·         An Interim Assessment would be conducted and would constitute 30% of the final grades of students. The final exam would account for 70% of students’ grade.
  • For information on Grading Scale, students may refer to Undergraduate Handbook for details.
·         Students MUST comport themselves during lectures. No acts of indiscipline such as ringing of mobile phones and all other acts that could distract the attention of other students while lectures are on-going would be tolerated